header image

NYFB Sets Priority Issues for 2022

by Jeff Williams

NYFB Director of Public Policy

 

 

The New York Farm Bureau State Board of Directors finalized the organization’s slate of priority issues for the new year at their December 2021 meeting.  The criteria used for priority issue selection are that the issue must have a broad-based agricultural impact, be of significant interest to county Farm Bureaus, and impact farmers’ ability to conduct business, make a profit, or affect quality of rural living. Also, the issue should attract member interest in anticipation of drawing their active participation and have a reasonable chance of being resolved.


These priority issues will be major topics of discussion with legislators, legislative staff, the Governor’s office, and state agencies in 2022 by NYFB members and Public Policy staff. 

 

 

The priority issues are:

• Double the Agricultural Workforce Retention Tax Credit.

• Establish a refundable investment tax credit for agriculture.

• Support critical funding for current agricultural animal health (such as the Avian Disease Program), promotion, research, and environmental programs in the final FY 22/23 state budget, including a $500 million Environmental Protection Fund.

•    Support legislation that adjusts New York’s unemployment insurance employer contribution rate, which would allow New York to replenish the UI trust fund without overburdening businesses with high UI tax bills as they recover from the pandemic.

•    Support legislation allowing direct to consumer shipping for all New York-produced farm beverages, including beer, cider, and distillates.

•    Support farmers in their efforts to adapt to and mitigate climate change through funding of critical programs in the Environmental Protection Fund and legislative programs that support on-farm renewable energy.

•    Support the development of solar energy that balances private property rights and the current and future land needs of agriculture in the state. Whenever possible, prime soils and actively farmed lands should be avoided in favor of previously disturbed or fallow lands and rooftop development for distributed generation. 

•    Support investment in new meat, vegetable, fruit and seafood processing facilities in New York

•    Oppose legislation that prohibits the use of agricultural pesticides.

•    Oppose Extended Producer Responsibility legislation that doesn’t require consumer responsibility for packaging they receive.

•    Ensure a common-sense resolution to DEC’s water withdrawal regulatory actions for farms.

•    Pursue legislation that would require utilities to maintain a minimum height of 20 feet for power lines and 18 feet for other lines over farm fields upon request of landowner or farmer who is leasing the land.


Criteria for Determining Priority Issues

•    The issue must have a broad-based agricultural impact.
•    The issue must be of significant interest to county Farm Bureaus.
•    The issue must impact farmers’ ability to conduct business, make a profit, or affect quality of rural living.
•    The issue should attract member interest in anticipation of drawing their active participation.
•    The issue should have a reasonable chance of being resolved.
Protection Fund.

•    Support legislation that adjusts New York’s unemployment insurance employer contribution rate, which would allow New York to replenish the UI trust fund without overburdening businesses with high UI tax bills as they recover from the pandemic.

•    Support legislation allowing direct to consumer shipping for all New York-produced farm beverages, including beer, cider, and distillates.

•    Support farmers in their efforts to adapt to and mitigate climate change through funding of critical programs in the Environmental Protection Fund and legislative programs that support on-farm renewable energy.

•    Support the development of solar energy that balances private property rights and the current and future land needs of agriculture in the state. Whenever possible, prime soils and actively farmed lands should be avoided in favor of previously disturbed or fallow lands and rooftop development for distributed generation. 

•    Support investment in new meat, vegetable, fruit and seafood processing facilities in New York

•    Oppose legislation that prohibits the use of agricultural pesticides.

•    Oppose Extended Producer Responsibility legislation that doesn’t require consumer responsibility for packaging they receive.

•    Ensure a common-sense resolution to DEC’s water withdrawal regulatory actions for farms.

•    Pursue legislation that would require utilities to maintain a minimum height of 20 feet for power lines and 18 feet for other lines over farm fields upon request of landowner or farmer who is leasing the land.