New York Farm Bureau Pushes Back on Proposed Chocolate Milk Ban in NYC Schools

New York Farm Bureau's President, David Fisher, sent a letter to the New York City Schools Chancellor, Richard Carranza, asking him and city leaders to drop a proposed ban on chocolate milk in public schools.

The letter stresses the importance flavored milk has to an overall healthy diet for students, and it cites numerous studies that reveal the negative impacts that came about when other school districts issued similar bans.

President Fisher’s letter reads in part, “New York State is home to over 4,000 dairy farms and represents New York’s largest agriculture industry. Our dairy farmers are proud to supply a wholesome product to school children all across New York, including New York City. There have been many studies that show the importance of dairy in children’s diets and the benefits of the vitamins it provides. Research has shown children who drink flavored milk consume more of the important nutrients related to healthy growth and development such as calcium, vitamin D, and potassium, in comparison to non-flavored milk drinkers. Additionally, studies have shown that flavored milk consumption is not connected with weight gain or even high total daily sugar intake in children.”

It important for school leaders and city officials to have a full understanding of the issue. New York Farm Bureau appreciates that they have the best interest of students’ health at heart, but removing flavored milk is the unhealthy choice and will do a disservice to the thousands of students who depend on their school to provide a healthy, balanced diet.

The full letter can be found on New York Farm Bureau’s website:

https://www.nyfb.org/application/files/2715/6864/2111/Letter_to_NYC_Chancellor_RE_Chocolate_Milk.pdf

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New York Farm Bureau is the State’s largest agricultural lobbying/trade organization. Its members and the public know the organization as “The Voice of New York Agriculture.” New York Farm Bureau is dedicated to solving the economic and public policy issues challenging the agricultural community